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Use of Technology in Angola Infrastructure

Until we can get big data into our Angola villages and cities, we must focus on maximizing the technology we already have. Take, for example, public transportation in Angola, which is doing tremendous work. At this point, we have tapping and going in buses, so we know who is driving and don’t have to count the number of passengers; we have video surveillance systems for CCTV to control traffic; in town, we have sensors to determine where the area is crowded; and technology is used in waste management operations in certain of our towns. These are all tools that can help to better map the city and employ technology to improve city life (Ochara .et al 2019).

Africa is expected to be the world’s fastest urbanising continent by 2035, which will have a significant influence on Angola’s growth. In addition, Cape Town collaborated with network providers to collect data from sensors strategically positioned across the city. Satellite towns would be equipped with contemporary infrastructure to attract tech-savvy enterprises. Kenya, Rwanda, Nigeria, and other countries are also working hard to build satellite towns in locations around pre-existing cities. Low carbon investments can create urban services which meet basic human needs, draw on new and increasingly affordable technologies, and generate virtuous cycles of work, mobility, energy and health (Woodgate, 2019). 

The Smart urbanisation industry has some significant challenges. The main complaint about these cities is that they try to earn the reputation of being smart by making claims about their capabilities in the commercial sector. While some cities call urban transformation projects in progress or after an initial strategy has been approved, without having implemented or produced outcomes, other cities use the word for completed initiatives. While Smart City has a great brand image and is relevant to city marketing, certain cities have also taken use of Smart City’s unique qualities for communication purposes. In order to prevent the sort of discrepancy that can arise due to the wide usage of the Smart City idea, a substantial standardisation of the classification and scope of the idea is needed (Cruz ,et al 2018 ).

Developing smart cities in Africa can solve all these concerns. Big Data analytics will help cities and administrations prepare for the future and discover the best solutions. Angola’s incredibly rich, yet tragically poor. Unlike neighbors, aid doesn’t depend on foreign help or financial organizations (Owusu ,2017). Power is centered on José Eduardo dos Santos, serving since 1979. Between 1997 and 2001, according to one review, approximately $1.7bn disappeared from the government budget. Since the Civil War in 2002, the administration has tried to increase transparency. But many donors and officials still see the country as a sea of uncontrolled corruption, says DFID poll, and experts feel Angola has not helped dispel this perception. The IMF says that Angola’s government failed to intervene to undermine the president’s power grab. It stays below the Corruption Perceptions Index. Angola joins Ibrahim 42 of 48 nations (Chiambo , et al 2019). 

Furthermore, the continent can compete in the global economy with other cities throughout the world. But, until we can get big data into our African villages, we must focus on maximizing the technology we already have. Take, for example, public transportation in Africa, which is doing tremendous work. At this point, we have tapping and going in buses, so we know who is driving and don’t have to count the number of passengers; we have video surveillance systems for CCTV to control traffic; in town, we have sensors to determine where the area is crowded; and technology is used in waste management operations in certain of our towns. These are all tools that can help to better map the city and employ technology to improve city life (Ngunga , 2019). 

References

Chiambo, P.J., Coelho, J.P., Lima, A., Soares, F.B. and Salumbo, A., 2019. Angola: rice crop grow and food security reinforcement. J. Rice Res7(2), p.205.

Cruz, I., Jaupi, L., Sequesseque, S.K.N. and Cottray, O., 2018. Enhancing Humanitarian Mine Action in Angola with High-Resolution UAS IM. Journal of Conventional Weapons Destruction22(3), p.5.

Ngunga, E.J., 2019. Higher education, R&D, and challenges in national innovation system building of Angola. In Innovation, Regional Integration, and Development in Africa (pp. 191-210). Springer, Cham.

Ochara, N., Wapota, A. and Abrahams, L., 2019, October. A Relational Ontology of “Open” Digital Infrastructures in Socially Excluded Communities in Angola. In 2019 Open Innovations (OI) (pp. 377-384). IEEE.

Owusu-Sekyere, E., 2017. Southern Africa-China economic relations: trends and outcomes-trade and industry.

Woodgate, S., 2019. Angola. In Integrated Space for African Society (pp. 243-253). Springer, Cham.

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